Archive for category From the President

ACEP and the Choosing Wisely Campaign

ACEP President Dr. David SeabergA campaign called Choosing Wisely has gotten some attention of late because of its stated goal of reducing health care costs by eliminating tests and procedures that are not “necessary.” Since Choosing Wisely launched, nine medical specialty organizations have offered up their top five items for the chopping block.  These range from CT scans for fainting from the American College of Physicians to antibiotics for chronic sinusitis from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

ACEP was asked to join the campaign in 2011, and after extensive review and discussion at the Committee level, ACEP declined.  There are several reasons for our initial response:

  • Emergency physicians have no right of refusal with our patients and often pick up the slack for other members of our esteemed profession. A recent member poll showed that 97% of us report seeing patients on a daily basis who are sent to the emergency department by their primary care physician. Many of these patients have been sent in with expressed instructions from the family physician to have this or that test ordered either because their office practice is swamped, the office is closed, or they lack the facilities to perform these tests. 
     
  • ABIM, the organization sponsoring the campaign, refused to allow any discussion of liability reform as a component of the Choosing Wisely campaign. To quote from the letter ACEP Past President Dr. Sandy Schneider sent to Daniel Wolfson, ABIM’s Executive VP and COO: “This is a significant issue in emergency medicine and a critical factor as to why emergency physicians order the number of tests and procedures they do.  Unlike primary care physicians, emergency physicians are not chosen by their patients, who have a greater tendency to sue for any perceived untoward event. In addition, we often lack prior care information. It is simply not possible for emergency physicians to talk about reducing ‘unnecessary’ testing without including messages about the need for medical liability reform.”
     
  • Emergency physicians approach our patients with the goal of eliminating anything life threatening. We cannot afford to miss anything, even something that seems like a long-shot. The consequences may be life or death for our patients. A test that is unnecessary for 99 patients may save the life of patient number 100.
     
  • Emergency medical care constitutes just 2 percent of all health care spending in the United States, no doubt in part because so much of the care we deliver is uncompensated. We are masters of efficiency and improvisation but there is only so far a dollar can be stretched. Emergency departments have been closing at an alarming rate across the country because so much care isn’t paid for. This is not the place to cut costs any further.
     
  • Lastly, should ACEP participate in this campaign, it very well may assure that emergency physicians will not receive reimbursement for the five identified procedures or tests.

ACEP is dedicated to advancing emergency care and promoting evidence-based quality improvement measures for its patients. To that end, we are reevaluating our response to the Choosing Wisely campaign by developing a workgroup, comprised of members from the Reimbursement, Medical-Legal, EM Practice, Clinical Policies, Quality and Performance, and Public Relations Committees to examine the issue and prepare a proposal for ACEP Board consideration.

DAVID SEABERG, MD, FACEP
President, American College of Emergency Physicians

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Call for Unity – March 21, 2010

Angela Gardner, MDToday’s health care reform vote on Capitol Hill, while high drama, really only signals the beginning of the work that needs to be done by emergency physicians to improve access to emergency care for our patients and future patients.  As I write this, I am watching the floor deliberations via the miracle of technology, and I know that the outcome will disappoint 48% of ACEP members, 48% of all physicians, and 48% of the American public, if polls are to be believed … and that will occur regardless of the outcome.

The greatness of our democracy lies in the ability of our people to freely elect their government representatives and to express themselves fully in the debate over crucial issues.  Never in my lifetime has this been more apparent than during the health care reform debate.  I believe that almost everyone has an opinion on health care, including many non-Americans, and almost everyone has expressed that opinion at some point.

The real challenge to our democracy, to our specialty, and to our organization is to move forward once today’s vote has been taken.  We must have great care not to fall victim to Jefferson’s “tyranny of the minority.”  We must move forward to create the greatest health care system in the world, befitting the greatest nation in the world, no matter the outcome of today’s vote.

There is no “win” today for emergency medicine.  There is only new illumination on the path to achieving better emergency care.  The real work comes as we identify areas that need our skills in innovation and problem-solving and get to work shoring up the nation’s emergency care system.  My fervent wish is that emergency physicians will find a common bond in the needs of our patients, and put the rancor and division of the path to health care reform behind us in the interest of better emergency care for everyone.

       
Thank you for your leadership and partnership in this endeavor,
Angela

Angela  F. Gardner, MD, FACEP
President
American College of Emergency Physicians

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ACEP’s Health Care Reform Positions: A Letter to the ACEP Council

Angela Gardner, MDIn a letter to the ACEP Council this week, ACEP President Dr. Angela Gardner outlined the current state of national health care reform and conveyed the essential components of reform outlined in ACEP policies. Her letter includes ACEP’s positions and a breakdown of the EM provisions in the pending bills.

“In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the need for comprehensive reform of America’s health care system. With almost 50 million uninsured Americans and sharply rising costs in health care, the current system is unsustainable. There is, however, considerable disagreement and controversy over how to fix the severely challenged health care system.”

Read the letter online.

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ACEP Leaders Invited to White House for Health Care Event

ACEP President Angela Gardner, MD, FACEP, had a front row seat Wednesday for President Obama’s release of his final version of a health care reform bill and shook the President’s hand after his speech.

The White House invited ACEP to bring several emergency physicians to attend the high-profile press conference. Joining Dr. Gardner at the event were ACEP President-Elect Sandra Schneider MD, FACEP; Federal Government Affairs Committee member Bruce Auerbach, MD, FACEP; and EMRA Board of Directors member and Legislative Advisor Nathaniel Schlicher, MD, JD.

President Obama released a revised bill, calling it a compromise plan that combines the best ideas of Democrats and Republicans, including insurance reforms, measures to curb waste, fraud and abuse in the system and increased funding for state grants on medical malpractice reform projects.

In his speech, the president urged Congress to “finish its work” and that “now is the time to make a decision” about health care reform.

Watch the ACEP members comment about attending the event.

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